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Welding Weasels; 35th MXS mend Falcon mission

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, turns a wire speed dial at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. The dial controls how fast it feeds metal into a CP-300 gas metal arc welder, providing extra material to bind other parts together. The flight repairs metal for the F-16 Fighting Falcon, ensuring its power projection across the Indo-Asian Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, turns a wire speed dial at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. The dial controls how fast it feeds metal into a CP-300 gas metal arc welder, providing extra material to bind other parts together. The flight repairs metal for the F-16 Fighting Falcon, ensuring its power projection across the Indo-Asian Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, welds on an acorn table at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. The table is made with a special coating to prevent hot metals from sticking to its surface and includes numerous slots for users to fasten parts while working. The shop makes the F-16 Fighting Falcon mission continue by providing fixes to aircraft parts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, welds on an acorn table at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. The table is made with a special coating to prevent hot metals from sticking to its surface and includes numerous slots for users to fasten parts while working. The shop makes the F-16 Fighting Falcon mission continue by providing fixes to aircraft parts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, welds steel bars together at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. Once Airmen have arrived to Misawa, they are given one year to complete their certifications work on aircraft. After receiving credentials, they work to further their welding skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, welds steel bars together at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. Once Airmen have arrived to Misawa, they are given one year to complete their certifications work on aircraft. After receiving credentials, they work to further their welding skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

Slag sits on a steel bar at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. Slag consists of all the impurities left over from heated metal. Airmen scrub away the substance with a wire brush and make final touches on the weld if needed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

Slag sits on a steel bar at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. Slag consists of all the impurities left over from heated metal. Airmen scrub away the substance with a wire brush and make final touches on the weld if needed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, scrubs away slag from a steel bar at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. Slag consist of all the impurities left over from heated metal. The substance remains on the surface which is brushed away with a wired brush after a weld. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, scrubs away slag from a steel bar at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 1, 2017. Slag consist of all the impurities left over from heated metal. The substance remains on the surface which is brushed away with a wired brush after a weld. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan --

The 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technicians use their skills to fabricate and modify parts to fit mission requirements, enabling Misawa to bring the fight to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region by enhancing our principles, partnerships, presence and power projection over a wider geographic range.

According to Airman 1st Class Elfie Diltz, a 35th MXS aircraft metals technology technician, there is always work to be done because many agencies depend on their knowledge for machining and welding.

“Our shop is valuable because we are able to mend aircraft parts,” Diltz said. “If the jets have anything cracked in the engine, they will not function properly, or it could lead to a dangerous situation due to an F-16 malfunction. We also support other shops such as aircrew ground equipment, avionics, armament, propulsions and many other flightline units, so they can execute their jobs as well.”