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Misawa's munitions flight is F-16's “bomb shop”

Better do it right

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Troy Decasteele, left, and Senior Airman Giuseppe Priolo, right, both 35th Maintenance Squadron stockpile management crew chiefs, ensure all shipments are ready at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2018. It’s the responsibility of ammunitions systems specialists to assemble and process nonnuclear weapons. Several of the main duties of these specialists are to receive, identify, inspect, store, recondition, ship, issue, deliver, maintain, test and assemble guided and unguided non-nuclear munitions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Xiomara M. Martinez)

Let’s get er’ done

Airmen with the 35th Maintenance Squadron munitions shop, tie down assets at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2018. It’s the responsibility of ammunitions systems specialists to assemble and process nonnuclear weapons. With attention to detail and extreme care, these experts handle, store, transport, arm and disarm weapons systems to ensure the safety and success of the mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Xiomara M. Martinez)

Storing assets

U.S. Air Force Airman Vivian Rowley, a 35th Maintenance Squadron stockpile management crew chief, ensures assets stay in place at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2018. It’s the responsibility of ammunitions systems specialists to assemble and process nonnuclear weapons. Several of the main duties of these specialists are to receive, identify, inspect, store, recondition, ship, issue, deliver, maintain, test and assemble guided and unguided non-nuclear munitions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Xiomara M. Martinez)

Tightening up

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class LeRonte' Williams, a 35th Maintenance Squadron stockpile management crew chief, ties down assets at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2018. It’s the responsibility of ammunitions systems specialists to assemble and process nonnuclear weapons as well as receive, identify, inspect, store, recondition, ship, issue, deliver, maintain, and test guided and unguided non-nuclear munitions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Xiomara M. Martinez)

Everything is almost done

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jonathan Trimble, the 35th Maintenance Squadron stockpile management production supervisor, ensures all tasks are finished at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18. 2018. It’s the responsibility of ammunitions systems specialists to assemble and process nonnuclear weapons. Several of the main duties of these specialists are to receive, identify, inspect, store, recondition, ship, issue, deliver, maintain, test and assemble guided and unguided non-nuclear munitions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Xiomara M. Martinez)

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan -- "Ammo!" yell 35th Maintenance Squadron munitions Airmen following a loud boom of their miniature cannon echoing across the room.

This war cry threads Ammo personnel together with a sense of pride for their unit.

With attention to detail and extreme care, these experts handle, store, transport, build, and test weapons systems to ensure the safety and success of operations.

"Our main mission supports the F-16 Fighting Falcon's daily flying and training procedures" said Staff Sgt. Richard Brooks, the 35th MXS munitions operations NCO in charge. "We provide all bombs and maintain stockpiles of built-up missiles."

When executing operational procedures, 35th Fighter Wing pilots, security forces personnel, explosive ordnance disposal flight and maintenance workshops require many munitions to sustain operations, and Ammo provides for all of these units. As the munitions are expended, a supply chain refills weaponries.

Without Ammo, the mission at Misawa AB would be interrupted.

Despite the daily demands on the job, Staff Sgt. Jonathan Trimble, the 35th MXS Munitions Stockpile Management Production Supervisor, finds the people he works with to be his favorite part of the job.

“They make the workload easier to complete,” explained Trimble. “We have a blast at work, and it’s fun to meet people from all over the world and see our diverse personalities work as a team. Times like these serve as a reminder for why I enjoy my career.”

Not only do personnel feel like a family at work, but they believe their organization differs from others.

“What makes us dissimilar is how secluded our group is from the rest of the base,” said Senior Master Sgt. Luke Thompson, the 35th MXS Material Section Chief. “The way we support one another is fantastic. Our Airmen are very proud to effectively provide materiel to support aircraft and manage all ammunitions.”

With the beat of their drum and building of bombs, Ammo’s Airmen keep Misawa’s F-16’s armed for regional stability.