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Airfield systems Airmen uphold Wild Weasel mission

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems section, inspect a localizer antennae at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The antennae transmit signals at different phases for correct modulation. The flight ensures serviceability of airfield systems, which give a multitude of accurate readings to pilots, weather personnel and air traffic controllers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems section, inspect a localizer antennae at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The antennae transmit signals at different phases for correct modulation. The flight ensures serviceability of airfield systems, which give a multitude of accurate readings to pilots, weather personnel and air traffic controllers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Christopher Blackwell, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, climbs an AN/FMQ 19 at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The AN/FMQ 19 is an integrated system of weather sensors that measure, collect and disseminate meteorological data to help pilots, weather personnel and air traffic controllers prepare and monitor weather forecasts. By Airfield systems Airmen enable, F-16 Fighting Falcons to contribute to Pacific Air Forces’ mission to deter aggression with allies and maintain peace and stability in the Indo-Asia- Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Christopher Blackwell, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, climbs an AN/FMQ 19 at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The AN/FMQ 19 is an integrated system of weather sensors that measure, collect and disseminate meteorological data to help pilots, weather personnel and air traffic controllers prepare and monitor weather forecasts. By Airfield systems Airmen enable, F-16 Fighting Falcons to contribute to Pacific Air Forces’ mission to deter aggression with allies and maintain peace and stability in the Indo-Asia- Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, cleans a visibility sensor at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 28, 2017. The sensor provides visibility readings to assist in landing. Blake said the systems provide planes the ability to land, take-off and navigate the air space, all to accomplish the main goal of the Air Force—to fly, fight and win. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, cleans a visibility sensor at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 28, 2017. The sensor provides visibility readings to assist in landing. Blake said the systems provide planes the ability to land, take-off and navigate the air space, all to accomplish the main goal of the Air Force—to fly, fight and win. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

Desiccant containers sit attached to an AN/FMQ 19 at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The desiccant material absorbs moisture in the air for reading atmospheric pressure, which affects the information displayed to pilots and their instruments. With information received from the AN/FMQ 19s in conjunction with navigational aids, pilots, weather flights and air traffic controllers can safely land F-16 Fighting Falcons during zero-visibility weather. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

Desiccant containers sit attached to an AN/FMQ 19 at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The desiccant material absorbs moisture in the air for reading atmospheric pressure, which affects the information displayed to pilots and their instruments. With information received from the AN/FMQ 19s in conjunction with navigational aids, pilots, weather flights and air traffic controllers can safely land F-16 Fighting Falcons during zero-visibility weather. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, opens a radio transmitter front adjustments panel at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The panel provides power and frequency modification to the radio transmitters on the flight line. The airfield systems technicians use their capabilities to install and maintain radio frequency communications. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, opens a radio transmitter front adjustments panel at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The panel provides power and frequency modification to the radio transmitters on the flight line. The airfield systems technicians use their capabilities to install and maintain radio frequency communications. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, dials a spectrum analyzer at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The spectrum analyzer ensures tactical air navigation system power stays on the correct frequency. The machine also displays various nearby frequencies for Airmen to monitor. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, dials a spectrum analyzer at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 27, 2017. The spectrum analyzer ensures tactical air navigation system power stays on the correct frequency. The machine also displays various nearby frequencies for Airmen to monitor. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, performs a check on an instrument landing system at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 28, 2017. The ILS provides horizontal and vertical guidance for pilots landing and taking off. Airfield systems technicians periodically perform preventative maintenance inspections on equipment to ensure serviceability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th Operations Support Squadron airfield systems technician, performs a check on an instrument landing system at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Feb. 28, 2017. The ILS provides horizontal and vertical guidance for pilots landing and taking off. Airfield systems technicians periodically perform preventative maintenance inspections on equipment to ensure serviceability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan --

Airmen of the 35th Operations Support Squadron secure Misawa’s mission by providing maintenance and ensuring serviceability of all airfield systems, allowing for a multitude of accurate readings to pilots, weather and air traffic controller personnel.

To accomplish their maintenance tasks, the airfield systems section installs, removes, relocates, modifies, deploys, and maintains fixed and mobile meteorological, navigation and air traffic control ground-to-air radio systems.

“When properly maintained, our systems, as a whole, give pilots and their families a peace of mind,” said Airman 1st Class Tristan Blake, a 35th OSS airfield systems technician. “The systems provide planes the ability to land, take-off and navigate the air space, all to accomplish the main goal of the Air Force—to fly, fight and win.”