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I have a dream

Edgren High School students grasp each other’s wrist symbolizing equality among all people at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 11, 2017. On Aug. 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr., gave his “I Have a Dream,” speech as a part of the African-American Civil Rights stance against racism. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

Edgren High School students grasp each other’s wrist symbolizing equality among all people at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 11, 2017. On Aug. 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream,” speech as a part of the African-American Civil Rights stance against racism. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Macias, left, the 35th Maintenance Squadron metals technology flight chief, and Airman 1st Class Anthony Thelamour, right, a 35th MXS metals technology technician, attend a Martin Luther King Jr. Observance Day luncheon at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2017. The luncheon was held to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as an inspirational man in history. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. John Macias, left, the 35th Maintenance Squadron metals technology flight chief, and Airman 1st Class Anthony Thelamour, right, a 35th MXS metals technology technician, attend a Martin Luther King Jr. Observance Day luncheon at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 13, 2017. The luncheon was held to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as an inspirational man in history. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jamel Smith, left, Airman Robert Sheran, center, and Airman 1st Class Whitney Dorman, right, pose in the court room at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 12, 2017. During the African-American Civil Rights Movement, laws such as “Brown v. Board of Education,” “Voting Rights Act of 1965” and the “Civil Rights Act of 1968,” initiated the end of racism in America. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jamel Smith, left, Airman Robert Sheran, center, and Airman 1st Class Whitney Dorman, right, pose in the court room at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 12, 2017. During the African-American Civil Rights Movement, laws such as “Brown v. Board of Education,” “Voting Rights Act of 1965” and the “Civil Rights Act of 1968,” initiated the end of racism in America. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing staff agencies stand and salute at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 12, 2017. On July 26, 1948, former President Harry S. Truman signed an executive order declaring, “There shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin.” To this day, that legacy of inclusion continues in the U.S. armed forces for all who serve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing staff agencies stand and salute at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 12, 2017. On July 26, 1948, former President Harry S. Truman signed an executive order declaring, “There shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin.” To this day, that legacy of inclusion continues in the U.S. armed forces for all who serve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

Edgren High School students join hands as they pose representing the realization of Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of equality at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 12, 2017. King’s speech included his dream to see equality in the schools and end laws like “Plessy v. Ferguson”, which mandated “Separate but equal” treatment between Caucasian and African-American people. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

Edgren High School students join hands as they pose representing the realization of Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of equality at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Jan. 12, 2017. King’s speech included his dream to see equality in the schools and end laws like “Plessy v. Ferguson”, which mandated “Separate but equal” treatment between Caucasian and African-American people. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)

As a part of Operation Desert Storm, January – February, 1991, an F-4G Phantom launches a munition as a part of a Suppression of Enemy Air Defense mission during World War II. Since then, Misawa Air Base’s role transformed with the F-16 Fighting Falcon by contributing to Pacific Air Force’s “Rebalance” priority by building peace and prosperity for all nations across the Pacific region. (Courtesy Photo)

As a part of Operation Desert Storm, January – February, 1991, an F-4G Phantom launches a munition as a part of a Suppression of Enemy Air Defense mission during World War II. Since then, Misawa Air Base’s role transformed with the F-16 Fighting Falcon by contributing to Pacific Air Force’s “Rebalance” priority by building peace and prosperity for all nations across the Pacific region. (Courtesy Photo)

Lincoln Memorial, Wa. --

“Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of "interposition" and "nullification" -- one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today!

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; "and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together."