HomeNewsPhotos
Keyword: Category: Tag: Sort By:


Clear Search

Search Terms:
Category: All Images
9 results found

Pilots assigned to the 1st Special Operations Squadron fly above the Northern coast of Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. To sustain readiness in adverse conditions, FARP training can take place anytime, day or night. When a fighter squadron has FARP support, choices are tremendously increased. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, puts equipment away during a forward area refueling point training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. This concept allows fighter aircraft to land, replenish fuel or rearm before returning to air-battle operations within a short period of time in harsh territories. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, holds a fuel hose steady during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. With FARP support, any accessible airfield or island can be used to replenish aircraft and get them back to the fight, delivering airpower lethality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, rolls up a fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP ensures the rapid transfer of fuel from one aircraft to another. In this case, an MC-130J and two F-16 Fighting Falcons. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, drains the gas from a fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP, a specialty within the petroleum, oils and lubrication career field, trains Airmen to effectively refuel aircraft in remote locations when air-to-air refueling is not possible or when fueling stations are not accessible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, unhooks the fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP plays a role in the U.S. military’s adaptive basing abilities to deliver airpower and lethality more efficiently anywhere in the world by being able to provide a mobile refueling point anywhere an aircraft can land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, observes forward area refueling point (FARP) training from inside a U.S. Air Force MC-130J at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. When a fighter squadron has FARP support, options are vastly increased, as any accessible airfield or island can be used to replenish fighters and send them back to the fight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 35th Air Maintenance Squadron directs an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a forward area refueling point training (FARP) exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP is the rapid transfer of fuel from one aircraft to another. This capability makes it possible for fighter aircraft to land, replenish fuel and return to air-battle operations within a short timeframe in austere environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Air Force MC-130J Commando II refuels an F-16 Fighting Falcon with its engines on during a forward area refueling point training (FARP) exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. Without FARP capabilities, U.S. Air Force aircraft are limited to air-to-air refueling and permanently-installed bases for their refueling needs. However, when a fighter squadron has FARP support, options are vastly increased, as any accessible airfield or island can be used to replenish fighters and send them back to the fight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details