HomeNewsPhotos
Keyword: Category: Tag: Sort By:
1 2 3 4 5 Next


Clear Search

Search Terms:
Category: All Images
835 results found

Man in uniform hands a certificate to another.
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 35th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron watch the 14th Fighter Squadron individual duty medical technicians perform Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) training during Agile Combat Employment week at Misawa, Japan, Dec. 10, 2020. This training simulated a more realistic approach by using a mannequin with fake blood and injuries to assist in broadening the casualty care knowledge base of Airmen, enabling them to be capable of executing the mission across an expanded spectrum of mission-sets. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force 35th Fighter Wing Airmen move cargo during Agile Combat Employment week at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2020. This concept strengthens our “Fight Tonight” mentality, ensuring the preparation of personnel for no notice contingencies and the capability of Airmen to rapidly deploy and operate out of an austere location. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Nicholas Covey, a 35th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron support technician, directs Senior Airman Russiel Huertas Muniz, a 35th AMXS crew chief as he relocates cargo during Agile Combat Employment (ACE) week at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2020. Utilizing the Multi-Capable Airmen concept in combination with ACE deployments, the U.S. Air Force can maintain mission capability with fewer deployed Airmen. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
Six U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons sit on the flightline during Agile Combat Employment week at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Dec. 10, 2020. This training integrated Multi-Capable Airmen concepts, which focuses on teaching skill-sets outside of one’s respective career field. For example, during this training a 35th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief taught a 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron Airman how to marshal an F-16 Fighting Falcon. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Airman Corey Tidwell, a 35th LRS fuels distribution journeyman, prepares to marshal an F-16 Fighting Falcon during Agile Combat Employment week at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Dec. 10, 2020. The 35th LRS tested a new cargo deployment function (CDF) process that centralized representatives from all units and their unpacked cargo in one location to collectively pack individual storage units, reducing the CDF timeline and deployment footprint. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Leonard J. Kosinski, the 5th Air Force vice commander of, operates a snow plow during the "Snow Rodeo" at Misawa Air Base, Japan, on Nov. 24, 2020. Misawa is about 40 miles from Aomori, one of the snowiest cities in the world. The highest recorded snowfall was 240 inches in 1984. In order for the mission to go on civil engineers stay busy during the snow season to ensure the airfield is open regardless of weather conditions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Leon Redfern)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Leonard J. Kosinski, the 5th Air Force vice commander, enters a snow plow during the "Snow Rodeo" at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 24, 2020. The Snow Rodeo allows Airmen to participate in a friendly competition in snow clearing operations. Misawa has a strong lead on keeping the title of the snowiest air force base in the world. This keeps civil engineers busy with 24-hour operations during the snow season, ensuring the airfield is open regardless of weather conditions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Leon Redfern)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Leonard J. Kosinski, the 5th Air Force vice commander, receives a briefing on aircrew flight equipment, or AFE, at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 23, 2020. In order to carry out the mission, every plane and pilot must be equipped and ready for any situation. AFE is one of the many units that ensure the safety and success of flying missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Leonard J. Kosinski, the 5th Air Force vice commander, and Chief Master Sgt. Kathleen McCool, 5th AF command chief, prepare to walk into the 14th Fighter Squadron at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 23, 2020. During their two-day visit, Kosinski and McCool received mission briefs from various 35th Fighter Wing units and agencies, had the opportunity to meet and interact with Airmen, and learn about the various roles Team Misawa members play to keep their community safe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, puts equipment away during a forward area refueling point training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. This concept allows fighter aircraft to land, replenish fuel or rearm before returning to air-battle operations within a short period of time in harsh territories. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, holds a fuel hose steady during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. With FARP support, any accessible airfield or island can be used to replenish aircraft and get them back to the fight, delivering airpower lethality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, rolls up a fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP ensures the rapid transfer of fuel from one aircraft to another. In this case, an MC-130J and two F-16 Fighting Falcons. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, drains the gas from a fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP, a specialty within the petroleum, oils and lubrication career field, trains Airmen to effectively refuel aircraft in remote locations when air-to-air refueling is not possible or when fueling stations are not accessible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, unhooks the fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP plays a role in the U.S. military’s adaptive basing abilities to deliver airpower and lethality more efficiently anywhere in the world by being able to provide a mobile refueling point anywhere an aircraft can land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, observes forward area refueling point (FARP) training from inside a U.S. Air Force MC-130J at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. When a fighter squadron has FARP support, options are vastly increased, as any accessible airfield or island can be used to replenish fighters and send them back to the fight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
Download Full Image Photo Details
1 2 3 4 5 Next