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A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, puts equipment away during a forward area refueling point training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. This concept allows fighter aircraft to land, replenish fuel or rearm before returning to air-battle operations within a short period of time in harsh territories. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
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A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, holds a fuel hose steady during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. With FARP support, any accessible airfield or island can be used to replenish aircraft and get them back to the fight, delivering airpower lethality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
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A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, rolls up a fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP ensures the rapid transfer of fuel from one aircraft to another. In this case, an MC-130J and two F-16 Fighting Falcons. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
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A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, drains the gas from a fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP, a specialty within the petroleum, oils and lubrication career field, trains Airmen to effectively refuel aircraft in remote locations when air-to-air refueling is not possible or when fueling stations are not accessible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
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A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, unhooks the fuel hose during a forward area refueling point (FARP) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP plays a role in the U.S. military’s adaptive basing abilities to deliver airpower and lethality more efficiently anywhere in the world by being able to provide a mobile refueling point anywhere an aircraft can land. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
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A U.S. Airman with the 1st Special Operations Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, observes forward area refueling point (FARP) training from inside a U.S. Air Force MC-130J at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. When a fighter squadron has FARP support, options are vastly increased, as any accessible airfield or island can be used to replenish fighters and send them back to the fight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
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A U.S. Airman with the 35th Air Maintenance Squadron directs an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a forward area refueling point training (FARP) exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. FARP is the rapid transfer of fuel from one aircraft to another. This capability makes it possible for fighter aircraft to land, replenish fuel and return to air-battle operations within a short timeframe in austere environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
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A U.S. Air Force MC-130J Commando II refuels an F-16 Fighting Falcon with its engines on during a forward area refueling point training (FARP) exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Nov. 18, 2020. Without FARP capabilities, U.S. Air Force aircraft are limited to air-to-air refueling and permanently-installed bases for their refueling needs. However, when a fighter squadron has FARP support, options are vastly increased, as any accessible airfield or island can be used to replenish fighters and send them back to the fight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class China M. Shock)
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Murtadiy Carrington, 35th Force Support Squadron Honor Guard bugle player, performs Taps during the POW/MIA Ceremony at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2020.  Since World War I, approximately 83,400 U.S. service members are still unaccounted for, and more than 150,000 Americans have been held as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Grace Nichols)
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U.S. Air Force Col. Jesse Friedel, 35th Fighter Wing commander, gives closing remarks during the National Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day ceremony at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2020. POW/MIA Recognition Day is traditionally held on the third Friday in September. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Grace Nichols)
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Japan Air Self Defense Force Maj. Gen. Takahiro Kubota, left, 3rd Air Wing commander, and U.S. Air Force Col. Jesse Friedel, right, 35th Fighter Wing commander, salute a wreath to honor prisoners of war and those missing in action during the National POW/MIA Recognition Day ceremony at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2020.  Since World War I, approximately 83,400 U.S. service members are still unaccounted for, and more than 150,000 Americans have been held as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Grace Nichols)
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Members of Team Misawa watch the National Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day ceremony at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2020.  Since World War I, approximately 83,400 U.S. service members are still unaccounted for, and more than 150,000 Americans have been held as prisoners of war. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Grace Nichols)
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Members of the Air Force Sergeants Association Chapter 1552 run in formation during the last few minutes of the 24-hour ruck as part of the National Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day ceremony at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2020. The AFSA chapter organized the event with help from other agencies on Misawa. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Grace Nichols)
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Members of the Air Force Sergeants Association Chapter 1552 stand in formation at during the National Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day ceremony at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2020. The National League of Families' POW/MIA flag was carried all 24-hours of the ruck, symbolizing the United States' resolve to never forget POWs or those who served their country in conflicts and are still missing. The father of a POW designed the flag after imagining what life was like for those behind barbed wire fences on foreign shores. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Grace Nichols)
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Members of Team Misawa participate in a 24-hour ruck to pay homage to those missing and to those who gave the ultimate sacrifice during the National Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 18, 2020. People from across the base participated in 30-minute shifts to keep the POW/MIA flag moving, non-stop for the entire 24-hour event. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Grace Nichols)
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Members of Team Misawa participate in a 24-hour ruck to pay homage to those missing and to those who gave the ultimate sacrifice during National Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 17, 2020. POW/MIA Recognition Day is traditionally held on the third Friday in September.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Grace Nichols)
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