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Participants from the 22nd Annual Baby Salmon Release pose for a group photo during the 22nd Annual Baby Salmon Release at Shimoda Salmon Park, Japan, March 16, 2019. This event showcases the rich history of Japanese culture in association with the planet as a part of an Earth Day celebration. American attendance strengthened the host nation partnerships by building relations with local Japanese.
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A child releases baby salmon into the Oirase River during the 22nd Annual Baby Salmon Release at Shimoda Salmon Park, Japan, March 16, 2019. After release, these fish begin their journey in the ocean to grow and reproduce. Later in the year, the salmon return for the Rokkasho Salmon Festival.
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Japanese children wait for the start of the 22nd Annual Baby Salmon Release at Shimoda Salmon Park, Japan, March 16, 2019. The park conducts this bilateral event as part of Earth Day, encouraging awareness and appreciation for the environment.
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Participants pause for a photo during the 22nd Annual Baby Salmon Release at Shimoda Salmon Park, Japan, March 16, 2019. Families volunteered to release more than 400,000 baby salmon into the Oirase River during the Earth Day event.
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Children release baby salmon into the Oirase River for the 22nd Annual Baby Salmon Release at Shimoda Salmon Park, Japan, March 16, 2019. The baby salmon released during this event were bred from last season’s salmon catch. After living three to five years in the Northern Sea, the fish find their way back to the river to create future generations.
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Buckets of baby salmon sit in the grass before release in the Oirase River for the 22nd Annual Baby Salmon Release at Shimoda Salmon Park, Japan, March 16, 2019. Yearly, Team Misawa members gathered with local Japanese residents to release young fish into the Oirase River, contributing to the local ecosystem.
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Hundreds of American and Japanese families gather at the Oirase River for the 22nd Annual Baby Salmon Release at Shimoda Salmon Park, Japan, March 16, 2019. This event allowed families to release baby salmon into the river. The salmon later return as adults for the Oirase River Salmon Festival later in the year. Misawa Air Base leadership participated in the event, sharing in cultural experiences with their Japanese neighbors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Branden Yamada)
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Shimichi Chiba, recycling center manager, pauses for a photo at Misawa, Japan, March 20, 2017. Misawa Air Base’s recycling center takes many items including paper, magazines, cardboard, aluminum, scrap metal, glass, plastic and car tires to assist in increasing Japan’s raw metal storage to be reused for the country’s infrastructure. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)
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Various cans lay in a bin at Misawa, Japan, March 20, 2017. Cans are recycled for aluminum alloy saving energy, raw materials and waste pollution. Aluminum cans are salvaged over and over to help save on industrial costs. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)
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Chizu Yoko, a recycling center employee, piles cardboard at Misawa, Japan, March 20, 2017. Misawa Air Base has 10 workers assigned to collect, sort and transport trash. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)
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Chizu Yoko, a recycling center employee, begins separating trash received from military housing at Misawa, Japan, March 20, 2017. Currently Misawa recycles 31 percent their trash with the plan to increase to 65 percent by year 2018. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)
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Remnants of shredded plastic sit on a conveyor belt at Misawa City, Japan, Mar. 20, 2017. Items like plastic bottles, glass and cardboard are recycled to be used for different purposes throughout Japan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)
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A Japanese national recycling center trash sorter clears out a dump truck at Misawa City, Japan, Mar. 20, 2017. Misawa Air Base, disposes of approximately 6,300 tons of trash a year with 31 percent of the trashrecycled. Currently the base is at a 31 percent recycling rate, with a goal to achieve a 65 percent recycling rate by 2020 (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)
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Haru Furujika, a recycling center trash sorter, throws a plastic bottle onto a conveyor belt at Misawa City, Japan, March 20, 2017. Japan’s recycling law is in affect to assist in providing the country with materials. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Sadie Colbert)
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