HomeNewsArticle Display

Multi-Capable Misawa Airmen “ACE” Training To Accelerate Change

People in uniform smooth wet cement under a blue sky.

U.S. Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing finish spall repair training by going over concrete quickset mix during a Multi-Capable Airmen (MCA) training course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 1, 2021. The MCA course trains multiple Airmen quarterly in support of Agile Combat Employment (ACE) operations. It provides Airmen a chance to expand their skill sets and allows them to support the operationalization of the ACE concept. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

People in uniform operate a large forklift.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class George Cravins, 35th Civil Engineer Squadron pavements and heavy equipment operator, instructs Staff Sgt. Aaron Ganoy, 35th Civil Engineer Squadron structures craftsman, on operating the 10K All-terrain Forklift during a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 2, 2021. The 10K All-terrain Forklift provides several capabilities, such as loading cargo onto various vehicles while traversing harsh terrain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

A group of uniformed personnel operate a large tool.

U.S. Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing prepare to anchor a fiber-reinforced polymer matting on an asphalt surface during a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 1, 2021. The five-day training included various activities followed up with a capstone to test the Airmen's capabilities on performing tasks without guidance from the instructors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

A man in uniform uses a wrench-like tool to connect large wires to a piece of machinery.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Thearith Em, 35th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical power production journeyman, instructs Staff Sgt. Elijah Afraid of Lightening, 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft structural maintenance craftsman, on attaching corresponding wires to generator prongs during a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Aug. 31, 2021. The overall goal of the MCA course is to train teams of Airmen who will be able to sustain a base with limited numbers while generating combat airpower. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

A man in uniform uses a brush to clean out a divot in concrete.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Daniel Hicks, 35th Civil Engineer Squadron heating, ventilation, and air conditioning technician, cleans out a spall while preparing it for repair during a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 1, 2021. A spall repair utilizes quick set concrete to temporarily repair airfield damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

A piece of heavy machinery kicks up a cloud of dust.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Benjamin Topps, 35th Civil Engineer Squadron pavements and heavy equipment operator, operates a 279D Compact Truck Loader during the spall repair section of a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 1, 2021. A spall repair is a procedure that temporarily repairs small cavities within the runway due to damage from an attack. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

Several people in uniform sit in a classroom.

U.S. Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing attend a classified material handling class during a Multi-Capable Airmen (MCA) course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 1, 2021. MCA are teamed together to train, exercise and deploy to generate combat airpower while supporting the Agile Combat Employment concept. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

People in uniform use power tools to attach a surface to the ground.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Robin Ho, 35th Operations Support Squadron intelligence analyst, and Senior Airman Guido Magnone, 35th Civil Engineer Squadron electrical systems technician, attach fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) mats during a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Sept. 1, 2021. The FRP matting and anchoring system is a way to expedite runway repair after enduring combat damage. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

A man in uniform pulls on a ratchet strap on top of a large piece of cargo.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Elijah Afraid of Lightening, 35th Maintenance Squadron aircraft structural maintenance craftsman, tightens a ratchet tie-down strap on a cargo pallet during a Multi-Capable Airmen (MCA) course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Aug. 30, 2021. The MCA course included various activities ranging from base planning to runway repair providing the Airmen with a plethora of new skill sets. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

People in uniform connect wires to a satellite dish.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 13

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Seth Vaughn, 35th Communication Squadron (CS) radio frequency transmission system technician, instructs Senior Airman Oscar Fletes, 35th Operation Support Squadron radar airfield weather systems technician, how to assemble cables on a communication flyaway kit (CFK) during a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Aug. 30, 2021. This portion of the course teaches Airmen from different career fields how to set up a CFK without the support of dedicated CS personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

Uniformed people assemble a collapsible satellite dish.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 13

U.S. Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing attach dish panels to a communication flyaway kit (CFK) during a Multi-capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Aug. 30, 2021. The CFK provides secure methods of communication during emergency and contingency operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

People pull on heavy duty ratchet straps to secure a large piece of cargo.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 12 of 13

U.S. Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing, prepare cargo during a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Aug. 30, 2021. Teaching Airmen in various career fields how to prepare cargo for airlift increases readiness by enabling the Air Force to push more cargo to various locations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

Uniformed personnel look at a disassemble piece of equipment.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 13 of 13

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Oscar Fletes, 35th Operation Support Squadron radar airfield weather systems technician, inspects a communication flyaway kit for setup during a Multi-Capable Airmen course at Misawa Air Base, Japan, Aug. 30, 2021. Communication flyaway kits provide communication capabilities to personnel in even the most austere locations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Antwain Hanks)

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan --

Team Misawa Airmen are actively operationalizing Agile Combat Employment (ACE) by conducting regularly reoccurring weeklong Multi-Capable Airmen (MCA) training at Misawa Air Base, Japan. During the Aug. 30 - Sept. 3, 2021 MCA course, 33 more Airmen from Misawa AB were trained.

In August of 2020, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr. challenged Airmen across the globe to accelerate change.

“The Airmen at Misawa Air Base are leading the charge to accelerate change in the Indo-Pacific region by operationalizing ACE and MCA training,” said Col. Jesse J. Friedel, 35th Fighter Wing commander. “We are training more MCA and putting them to the test during ACE exercise scenarios to improve our defensive and offensive capabilities, to ensure our competitive advantage, and to protect our assets and personnel in the future.”

MCA training is designed to empower Airmen to accelerate change by expanding the scope of tasks Airmen can complete in support of ACE during expeditionary and wartime operations.

“The goal of Misawa Air Base’s five-day MCA training is to train Airmen on tasks outside his or her primary job,” said Senior Master Sgt. Jeremy R. Snowden, 35th Fighter Wing ACE director. “MCA will be teamed together to train, exercise and deploy in order to recover, refuel, reload, and launch combat airpower and support joint affairs with a small, agile footprint.”

As stated in the Fiscal Year 2022 Department of the Air Force Posture Statement, ACE is the ability to quickly disperse and cluster forces to a cooperative security location and conduct operations across all domains with minimal disruption, while maintaining operational flexibility.

“Learning about other career fields and developing new skills while learning about the ACE concept was the biggest benefit gained from the training to me,” said Airman 1st Class Brandon Grasso, 14th Maintenance Squadron engines specialist. “It gave me a chance to take some of the skills I learned and share them back at my shop with fellow Airmen.”

In order to be agile and lean, MCA are trained on multiple expeditionary tasks.

“MCA represents a shift from traditional, large force packages of highly specialized Airmen who train to perform a limited scope of tasks,” said Snowden. “This training enables them to accomplish additional tasks while supporting ACE operations in an austere and expeditionary environment.”

The ACE capability is a valuable addition to U.S. security obligations and military focus in the Indo-Pacific region. The ACE concept was fundamentally designed and continues to evolve to maintain a competitive advantage in a fiscally constrained environment. This concept and the exercises and deployments conducted in support of its success underscore U.S. commitment to the Indo-Pacific region.